Don’t Let Flash And A Cool-Factor Fool You; These Are Some Of The Worst Cars Ever Made

No one wants to pick out a car only to have it break down on the way home. From faulty breaks to an engine that literally explodes if the car’s in an accident, the best thing to do while car shopping is to know what not to look for before heading to the dealership.

Some of the cars on our list didn’t suffer major breakdown issues but instead were released with horribly dated designs or suffered from awful underperformance issues based on the class of vehicle they were representing. Let’s check out some of the worst cars of all-time that left consumers in danger or underwhelmed.

The Ford Pinto Would Literally Explode

The Ford Pinto Would Literally Explode
Reg Burkett/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Reg Burkett/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Thought to be one of, if not the worst car ever manufactured, the Pinto was an absolute nightmare for Ford. While it was marketed as a fuel-efficient compact car, it had one tiny issue. The car had a tendency to explode.

That’s right; have it be a fender-bender, bad accident, or backing up into a tree, the Pinto would legitimately explode! The worst part was that Ford refused to fix the issue, opting to pay off victims of the explosions instead.

The Reason For The Peel Trident Is Unknown

The Reason For The Peel Trident Is Unknown
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

The Peel Trident is sort of like Stonehenge; no one really knows what its actual purpose is. Looking like something out of The Jetsons, the Peel Trident is known as the smallest car, at four-feet and two-inches long.

Even though the car was marketed as the ‘occasional two-seater,” people quickly found out there was nothing good about the car. Who likes to get cooked under plexiglass because a car is cheaply made, after all?

The Triumph TR7 Was Anything But Triumphant

The Triumph TR7 Was Anything But Triumphant
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

The year-long delay in the United States and the two-year delay in the United Kingdom should have been the first sign of trouble when it comes to the Triumph TR7. When the car was finally released in 1975 and ’76, people found it everything but triumphant.

Littered with maintenance issues, the affordable TR7 soon became one of the more expensive sports cars on the road. Pretty much, it was a doomed design from the start.

The Reliant Robin Wasn’t So Reliable

The Reliant Robin Wasn't So Reliable
Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images
Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images

Three wheels on a car? What could possibly go wrong? Answer: everything. Produced by England’s Reliant Motor Company, the Reliant Robin was compact, odd-looking, and had a tendency to flip over when the driver made turns.

Amazingly, this quirky vehicle never took off in the United States, making England its permanent home. Interestingly, the three-wheeled car is the second-most-popular fiberglass vehicle in history, regardless of its wobbly balance and odd design.

The 1975 AMC Pacer Wasn’t Safe For The Everyday Driver

The 1975 AMC Pacer Wasn't Safe For The Everyday Driver
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

Another product of the 1970s compact car craze was the 1975 AMC Pacer. Unfortunately, for the American Motor Company, the tiny car didn’t do them any favors. While it was top-notch in fuel economy and size, critics weren’t overly thrilled when it came to the car’s safety.

They were quick to point out that while the Pacer might be easy for a professional driver to handle on the track, it’s not ideal for the everyday folk driving to and from work. It’s pretty much like driving a tin can on wheels.

The Maserati Biturbo Was Affordable For A Reason

The Maserati Biturbo Was Affordable For A Reason
Denver Post via Getty Images
Denver Post via Getty Images

Maserati decided to take a leap of faith in 1981, producing an affordable car for everyday people. The result was the Maserati Biturbo, one of the worst cars to come out of the high-end brand.

When first purchased, the Biturbo worked great, proving that it came from a high-end company. But they needed to make some compromises to make the car affordable. So, after a few years, everything that could possibly leak, burst, or rupture did. And the interior wasn’t that stellar, being made with cheap materials.

One Citation Was The Downfall Of The Chevy Citation

One Citation Was The Downfall Of The Chevy Citation
Chevrolet
Chevrolet

When the Chevy Citation first appeared on the market in the 1980s, people were all about it. The car was compact, fuel-efficient, and family-friendly, checking off all of the 80s boxes. It was even named Motor Trend’s Car of the Year.

Well, all good things come to an end. And the Chevy Citations end came when Consumer Reports published an article saying the Citation was actually dangerous. Sales took a turn for the worst, and Chevy stopped making the Citation a few years later.

More Than One Issue Was Found In The Chevy Vega

More Than One Issue Was Found In The Chevy Vega
Jason Halstead/Getty Images
Jason Halstead/Getty Images

Ironically, in 1971, the Chevy Vega was named the Motor Trend Car of the Year. Unfortunately, it didn’t take long for people to realize the title was given out prematurely.

From engine problems to exterior rusting, the Vega was riddled with both engineering and aesthetic issues. Pretty much, the car was a disaster. Even after the company upgraded the model, people weren’t buying, and production wound up coming to a screeching halt after its 1977 upgrade.

Dodge Omni = Bad Breaks, Steering, And Poor Stability

Dodge Omni = Bad Breaks, Steering, And Poor Stability
Dodge
Dodge

During the 70s, the world of automobiles was changing. So long were the days of gas guzzlers and big trucks. People were more interested in cars such as the Dodge Omni, a smaller, fuel-efficient car to get them from Point A to Point B.

Consumer Reports didn’t agree with the car’s popularity, though. The publication said the car was unsafe to drive, with horrible brakes, bad steering, and poor stability. Ironically, it didn’t deter people from buying the Omni!

The 2004 Chevy SSR Was All Flash

The 2004 Chevy SSR Was All Flash
William Thomas Cain/Getty Images
William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

The Chevy SSR, or Chevy “Super Sport Roadster,” was a highly-anticipated car when it was released back in 2004. Unfortunately, customers soon realized the compact car was anything but super or sporty or something that should be on the road.

Instead, they found the body of the car to be overly heavy, resulting in a sluggish engine unable to support the weight. Sorry, folks, but a shiny retro design doesn’t make up for poor performance under the hood.

The Cadillac Fleetwood Was Jerky, Noisy, And Stalled Out

The Cadillac Fleetwood Was Jerky, Noisy, And Stalled Out
Danny Lawson/PA Images via Getty Images
Danny Lawson/PA Images via Getty Images

From 1976 until 1996, Cadillac manufactured the king of awkward cars, the Cadillac Fleetwood. For 20 years, the car had a reputation for jerking, stalling out, and, most importantly, making really weird sounds.

It’s a wonder how the company was able to keep this particular car on the market for so long. By the time 1996 rolled around, Cadillac was only producing 15,109 cars, less than half of its original production number during its release year.

Chevrolet HHR Had Six Million Recalls

Chevrolet HHR Had Six Million Recalls
Jason Merritt/FilmMagic for Uno Productions
Jason Merritt/FilmMagic for Uno Productions

During its six years on the market, the ever so ugly Chevrolet HHR had around six million recall notices. If that doesn’t say something about a car’s worth, we’re not sure what does.

Anyhow, a lot of the recall notices were for a failed electrical system. The failure made it so the airbag wouldn’t deploy and would make crashes more likely since assisted steering would be offline. Not to mention the ignition didn’t always work!

The Futuristic 1947 Davis D2 Divan Was Never Released

The Futuristic 1947 Davis D2 Divan Was Never Released
Davis
Davis

Is it a boat? Is it a plane? Is it a rocket ship? Nope, it’s just the 1947 Davis D2 Divan that just so happens to look like those three modes of transportation combined. Thankfully, for the general public, the D2 never made it to market.

Promoted as “the ultimate car of the future,” the D2 automakers found themselves in over their heads, owing investors money and not being able to make a return. And so, the D2 died before launching.

The Chevy Bel Air Might Be Iconic But It Wasn’t Popular

The Chevy Bel Air Might Be Iconic But It Wasn't Popular
Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The 1955-57 Chevy Bel Air model might be iconic for the time period, but the company probably wishes they did something else for those three years. Not that anything was wrong with the car, it was just overly generic and nothing special.

It’s almost like Chevy took every simple part from 1950s car design and threw it into one vehicle blueprint to mass-produce. Needless to say, it’s a good thing the Chevy logo was on the bumper.

Car Lovers Hated The Pontiac Aztek When It Was Announced

Car Lovers Hated The Pontiac Aztek When It Was Announced
JERRY HOLT/Star Tribune via Getty Images
JERRY HOLT/Star Tribune via Getty Images

Even though Walter White makes it look cool in Breaking Bad, the Pontiac Aztek was doomed from the get-go in the real world. Right away, car lovers hated the design, thinking it was exaggerated, ugly, and trying way too hard to be a ’90s soccer mom minivan.

It also doesn’t help that a minute-long job under the hood would now take a while, thanks to the Aztek’s bizarre layout. Removing a bar and the engine fuse box before getting to the battery? No, thank you.

The Mercedes CLA Was That One Time Mercedes Went Cheap

The Mercedes CLA Was That One Time Mercedes Went Cheap
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

When people tend to think of a Mercedes-Benz, a cheaply made car isn’t the first thing that pops into their heads. Well, the Mercedes CLA was just that — a budget-friendly “luxury” automobile that left people asking why they bothered to buy it in the first place.

According to TopGear, ” The CLA doesn’t drive particularly well and is neither comfortable nor refined…The engines grumble at low revs too much, and the twin-clutch gearbox makes a politician look decisive.”

No Supercar Had As Bad A Reputation As The Ferrari Mondial 8

Nothing Had As Bad A Reputation As The Ferrari Mondial 8
Ferrari
Ferrari

Upon its release in 1980, the Ferrari Mondial 8 was met with less than stellar reviews. People weren’t impressed with its weird proportions resulting from stuffing an engine and four seats into a 104.3-inch wheelbase.

By the time a year had passed, critics and Time magazine called the Ferrari Mondial 8 one of the worst cars of all-time. Its reputation became so bad that it was rumored each of the model’s systems failed.

The Amphicar Was Only Cool On Paper

The Amphicar Was Only Cool On Paper
James D. Morgan/Getty Images
James D. Morgan/Getty Images

Honestly, who wouldn’t want a car that can seamlessly go from driving on land to floating in the ocean or any other body of water? The keyword there is seamlessly, though, and the Amphicar’s transition from land to water was anything but seamless.

Produced from 1961 until 1968, the Amphicar was pretty impressive. But that doesn’t make up for the hours of maintenance the car required after going for a dip or the 13 joints that needed to be re-oiled!

The Mustang II Didn’t Do Too Well

The Mustang II Didn't Do Too Well
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

In the ’70s, Ford was all about their Pintos, a subcompact car that was fun to drive and would save on gas prices. Taking the Pinto design and the engine of a roadster, Ford developed the Mustang II, aka the poor man’s AMC Gremlin.

Not only was the car gutless, but its overall appearance looked cheap. Many people believe the Mustang II did so poorly solely because of its aesthetics; it wasn’t the Mustang buyers knew and loved.

The Morgan Plus 8 Was Sluggish

The Morgan Plus 8 Was Sluggish
Fairfax Media via Getty Images via Getty Images
Fairfax Media via Getty Images via Getty Images

While the Morgan Plus 8 was sleek and flashy, there was one aspect that made it very questionable in the eyes of car lovers. Originally manufactured in Britain, when the Morgan Plus 8 made its way across the pond, it ran into a slight issue.

The car wasn’t able to pass the United States’ emissions regulations. As a result, Morgan swapped out regular fuel for propane. The new fuel source made the car very sluggish, making 60mph feel like 30.

The Plymouth Prowler Was Flashy With No Perks

The Plymouth Prowler Was Flashy With No Perks
Edward Wong/South China Morning Post via Getty Images
Edward Wong/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

The Plymouth Prowler might have looked cool and ready for a race track, but that’s where its worth begins and ends. While the hot rod look was a huge selling feature, the designers forgot one huge aspect that makes or breaks a sports car, horsepower.

With 250 horsepower, car enthusiasts were less than impressed with the Prowler. Not destined to become one of the classics, Chrysler stopped manufacturing the Prowler in 2002.

The Lamborghini LM002 Off-Roading Truck No One Asked For

The Lamborghini LM002 Off-Roading Truck No One Asked For
John Keeble/Getty Images
John Keeble/Getty Images

Between 1986 and 1993, Lamborghini decided to go ahead and produce something no one particularly wanted or asked for, the Lamborghini LM002. Now, this vehicle wasn’t a luxury automobile but was marketed as an off-roading truck.

The company even marketed their “Cheetah” prototype to the American military! It didn’t stick with them or the general public because who would drive a Lambo through the mud, truck, or not! Lamborghini stuck by their design, though, producing 382 of the trucks.

Smart Fortwo Would Bake Its Occupants On A Warm Day

Smart Fortwo Would Bake Its Occupants On A Warm Day
Tristar Media/Getty Images
Tristar Media/Getty Images

The Smart Car is very popular among city folk, with its ability to fit practically anywhere. Not to mention they are very fuel-efficient cars! Unfortunately, the Fortwo gave Smart Cars a bad reputation.

Not only are they extremely small and uncomfortable, but the Fortwo had a pesky habit of baking the occupants of the car. With the engine in the back and the cooling system in the front, the Fortwo turned into an oven on warm days. Needless to say, customers weren’t happy with it, and sales plummeted.

A Year Later And The Lincoln Blackwood Was Gone

A Year Later And The Lincoln Blackwood Was Gone
Ford Motor Company/Getty Images
Ford Motor Company/Getty Images

In 2000, Lincoln and Ford teamed up in what would be one of the strangest cross-over vehicles ever: The Lincoln Blackwood. The idea was to take the luxury of a Lincoln interior and mesh it with a pickup truck.

Well, it didn’t really work out in the eyes of the buyer. Not that there was much wrong with the car. But it was the flashy car no one asked for, and it was off the market in less than a year.

The Yugo GV Was The Cheapest Car In The US For A Reason

The Yugo GV Was The Cheapest Car In The US For A Reason
Yugo
Yugo

The Yugo GV might have been the cheapest car in the United States during its release in the 80s, but it was also the worst. The tiny hatchback was notoriously bare, with only a few buttons in its cheaply-made interior. And to say the car was slow would be an understatement.

But what does one expect when the engine is located right next to the spare tire under the hood? This is a perfect example of the phrase “you get what you pay for.”

The Trabant Was Missing A Few Key Parts

The Trabant Was Missing A Few Key Parts
Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images
Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images

When Germany was divided into the East and the West, the former refused to buy cars from the latter, resulting in them needing to make a car in response to the Volkswagon Beetle. Well, their response wasn’t great. Actually, it was pretty bad and very unsafe.

East Germany went ahead and produced the Trabant, a tiny boxcar that is more suitable for a circus ring than the road. With no seatbelts, turn signals, or fuel gauge, the Trabant was an overall mess.

Zundapp Janus Made People Question Their Sanity

Zundapp Janus Made People Question Their Sanity
KEYSTONE-FRANCE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
KEYSTONE-FRANCE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

When it comes to appearance, the Zundapp Janus made people scratch their heads, blink twice, and realize that they’re not going insane. The car literally looks as though it could be facing either way!

The Janus was the result of a motorcycle company trying to make a splash in the world of automobiles. As seen in the above photo, it didn’t exactly work. Not only were the front and back doors an issue, but the car only reached 50mph!

The DeLorean DMC-12 Looked Cooler In The Movies

The DeLorean DMC-12 Looked Cooler In The Movies
Roland Weihrauch/picture alliance via Getty Images
Roland Weihrauch/picture alliance via Getty Images

While Doc Brown and Marty McFly made the DeLorean DMC-12 look beyond cool in Back to the Future, in the actual world, it was anything but. Don’t let the flash and funky doors fool you; this car is often considered an expensive failure.

With its electrical system issues, reliability problems, and poor quality, it’s amazing that these cars are still in high demand. In 2016, the company announced that it was making 300 replica models.

The Ford Edsel Was A Commercial Failure

The Ford Edsel Was A Commercial Failure
ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images
ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

Manufactured from 1958 through 1960, the Ford Edsel is now synonymous with “commercial failure.” Unfortunately for Ford, they overhyped the car so much that people were less than impressed when it was finally released.

Not only was the car overpriced, but it wasn’t fuel-efficient, and buyers found it vastly underwhelming. It didn’t take long before Ford pulled the model. It goes to show that over-hyping something isn’t a particularly good idea.

The Suzuki Samurai Had Little To No Power

Suzuki Samurai
Suzuki
Suzuki

Love it or hate it; it doesn’t change the fact that the Suzuki Samurai is one of the worst cars ever made. In fact, a 1988 Customer Reports called the car “dangerously unsafe” because it rolls over too easily.

For an off-roading car, rolling over is probably the last thing people want. Not to mention the power on the trucks was pretty much non-existent. According to FourWheeler, “the drivetrain is so bad the transfer case decided to get divorced from it!”

The Saturn ION Had One Too Many Problems

The Saturn ION Had One Too Many Problems
Saturn
Saturn

The Saturn ION was on the market between 2003 and 2007, and never once did it become popular. Instead, it became the pseudo bane of the GM Delta platform’s existence, with problems that kept popping up.

From transmission issues that resulted in the car jerking and drivers freaking out to transmission failures and the key getting stuck in the ignition, it’s no wonder this car only lasted for a few years. There was even a problem where the engine wouldn’t shut off!

AMC’s Downfall Was The 1968 Ambassador

AMC's Downfall Was The 1968 Ambassador
AMC
AMC

As the first American car to feature air conditioning, the 1968 Ambassador was meant to be a huge success for AMC. But, as it goes sometimes, the classic-looking car was actually the company’s downfall. Upon its release, Customer Reports gave the model a “Not Acceptable” rating due to its poor engineering.

Obviously, the rating didn’t help boost sales, and the company’s reputation as an independent automaker plummeted. Eventually, AMC was bought out by Chrysler.

The Elcar Was Getting Nowhere Fast

The Elcar Was Getting Nowhere Fast
Zagato
Zagato

The Elcar is a quirky-looking electric car produced by the Italian company Zagato from 1974 to 1976. But don’t let the electric part of the car fool you; this vehicle is anything but efficient.

Not only is the outward appearance not much to look at, but the Elcar’s engine only allowed it to go ten miles if the weather was under 40 degrees. It goes to show that something that looks better suited for a farm has no business being on the road.

The Fiat Multipla Looked Like An Optical Illusion

The Fiat Multipla Looked Like An Optical Illusion
Fiat
Fiat

Fiat planned to have this model be the next in line for the popular Multipla models, instead, it was its epic downfall. Looking like more of an optical illusion than something a person drives, the Fiat Multipla seemed to have taken designs from multiple cars, fused them, and hoped for the best.

The result was anything but the best, though, and left people scratching their heads. During its 1998 release, only 426 models were sold.

Cadillac Cimarron Was Double The Price Of A Similar Car

Cadillac Cimarron Was Double The Price Of A Similar Car
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images via Getty Images

Produced in the 1980s, the Cadillac Cimarron was a huge upset for anyone who was unfortunate enough to buy one. With an engine generating only 88hp, the Cimmarron was nothing to call home about.

And the fact that it was practically the same car as a Chevy Cavalier infuriated those who bought the Cimarron, considering the latter was almost double the price at the time, $30,300 in 2017.

The Citroën Pluriel Was Glitchy And Boring

The Citroën Pluriel Was Glitchy And Boring
Citroën Pluriel
Citroën Pluriel

Top Gear Magazine once called the Citroën Pluriel as “useless as a chocolate teapot.” And while a chocolate teapot is technically still edible, it does nothing in the ways of producing actual tea, much as the Citroën Pluriel doesn’t actually do anything for its driver.

Customers have called the car cheap-looking and boring, and when a vehicle is already known to be problematic and glitchy, being cheap and boring is the last thing it wants to be!

Basic Is The Best Way To Describe The Mitsubishi Mirage

Basic Is The Best Way To Describe The Mitsubishi Mirage
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

First produced in 1978, the Mitsubishi Mirage took a brief hiatus from the market before reappearing in 2012. But don’t let the fact that it made a comeback fool you; the car still isn’t the best.

In response to the new model, USA Today said, “The 2019 Mitsubishi Mirage ranks near the bottom of the subcompact car class. While it’s affordable, the Mirage’s glacial acceleration, poor ride quality, cheap cabin materials, and uncomfortable seats all drag down its appeal.”

The Dodge Royal Was More Like The Court Jester

1957 Dodge Lancer 4-Door with Couple Standing
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

With a litany of problems, the Dodge Royal was more like the court jester when it came onto the market in 1957. The classic-looking sedan was marred with horrible water leaks in the trunk and main cabin, resulting in a bit too much rust and system failures for anyone’s liking.

The issues did nothing for Chrysler’s reputation either, leaving them in a deep role that took years for the company to dig itself out of.

Smith Flyer: Car, Or Go-Kart?

Smith Flyer: Car, Or Go-Kart?
The Montifraulo Collection/Getty Images
The Montifraulo Collection/Getty Images

Produced from 1915 until 1925, the Smith Flyer was beyond a unique car. Not only did it look like a poorly made go-kart, but people looked a bit silly driving them. Lightweight with a gasoline engine mounted on a fifth wheel, this car should have been off the market years before 1925.

But simplicity does come with a few perks. While the car was no match for anything else on the market, it was extremely cheap, going for no more than $125.

The Overland Octoauto Wasn’t Bad, Just…Odd

The Overland Octoauto Wasn't Bad, Just...Odd
Vintage Everyday/Pinterest
Vintage Everyday/Pinterest

Unlike other cars on this list, there was nothing wrong with the Overland Octoauto underneath its hood. It’s just that the car itself is so odd that it deserves a place among these other cars.

With eight wheels, the 1911 car was more than difficult to maneuver on the streets, even if designer Milton Reeves did market it as being safer than your typical car. It never took off commercially, but Reeves did of on to invent the muffler. So, there’s that.

There Is Only One Scripps-Booth Bi-Autogo

There Is Only One Scripps-Booth Bi-Autogo
ko_mon/Twitter
ko_mon/Twitter

Produced from 1908 until 1912, the Scripps-Booth Bi-Autogo is more of a motorcycle than a car. Given on two wheels, the Bi-Autogo was able to sit up to three people and never made it to the American market.

The 1912 prototype is the only one in the world. Thankfully, in 2017, it was restored by the Detroit Historical Society, making it available for public viewing but not for taking it on joy rides around the parking lot.

Renault Dauphine Was A Rattling Slow Mess

Renault Dauphine Was A Rattling Slow Mess
Manfred Schmid/Getty Images
Manfred Schmid/Getty Images

If there is one thing French engineers probably regret, it’s the making of the Renault Dauphine. Not only could you hear rattling when you stood next to the car, but it was unimaginably slow.

The staff of Road and Track took the Dauphine for a spin and found that it took 32 seconds for the car to hit 60mph. As Renault is huge in the Indy circuit, that statistic is hard to believe!

Chevrolet Chevette Came Out During Big Truck Popularity

Chevrolet Chevette Came Out During Big Truck Popularity
Andrew Stawicki/Toronto Star via Getty Images
Andrew Stawicki/Toronto Star via Getty Images

While there was technically nothing wrong with the Chevrolet Chevette under the hood, it just came out during the wrong time. Chevy and their competitors were all about making fuel-efficient, subcompact cars, but by the time the Chevette came out, big trucks were making a swift and steady comeback.

Ironically, by the end of the 1970s, this model was named the most popular small car in America. However, it wasn’t enough to make Chevy mass-produce more.

The Ford Model T Was A Fire Hazard

The Ford Model T Was A  Fire Hazard
Mindy Schauer/Digital First Media/Orange County Register via Getty Images
Mindy Schauer/Digital First Media/Orange County Register via Getty Images

While the Ford Model T revolutionized the automobile industry, becoming the first affordable car in America, it had its fair share of issues. During a time when driving laws were just being written, being behind the wheel was a bit risky.

Having gas tanks located underneath the seats wasn’t ideal, as the car would burst into flames if hit. Then there was the flat windshield, which was known to cut anyone who was ejected from their seat. Thankfully, manufacturing companies lived on and learned.

The BMW X6 Never Should Have Been Released

The BMW X6 Never Should Have Been Released
Manfred Schmid/Getty Images
Manfred Schmid/Getty Images

For many people in the American working class, owning a BMW is a status symbol that says, “I’ve made it, and I’m not going anywhere.” Well, the X6 was more of a symbol of “I made it, and I kind of want to go back.”

Aside from having one of the worst styles in BMW history, the model was in its trial and error stages of production when it was released to the public. It didn’t end well.

The Aston Martin Lagonda Was An Ugly Catastrophe

The Aston Martin Lagonda Was An Ugly Catastrophe
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

Produced from 1974 to 1990, the Aston Martin Lagonda was a luxury car nightmare. Not only was it unusually long in appearance, but the four-door vehicle had a heft price tag on it even though it had more than one issue.

Buyers might have been able to overlook the cars “ugliest car in the last 50 years” status if the electronic instrument panel actually worked. Alas, it rarely worked in general, and people weren’t inclined to buy it.

Fuller Dymaxion Was The Car That Never Saw The Future

Fuller Dymaxion Was The Car That Never Saw The Future
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

The Fuller Dymaxion was first introduced to the public during the 1933 World’s Fair. The futuristic Buckminster Fuller design was meant to have the car not only drive on land but act as a submarine and a plane.

Unfortunately for the general populace, the car never made it to the commercial market, with Fuller designing only the one prototype. Some believe the production of the Dymaxion was put on hold because its designer thought it handled poorly.

The DeSoto Airflow Had Poor Marketing

The DeSoto Airflow Had Poor Marketing
Daily Herald Archive/SSPL/Getty Images
Daily Herald Archive/SSPL/Getty Images

First produced in 1934, the DeSoto Airflow was unlike anything people had seen before. With a unique body, the manufacturing company marketed the vehicle as “futuristic,” something that would come back to bite them.

At the time, people weren’t looking for something out of the ordinary. All they wanted was a reliable car. Kind of a let down for the company, considering the DeSoto Airflow handled a bit better than other cars of the time.

The PT Cruiser Was Released At A Bad Time

The PT Cruiser Was Released At A Bad Time
George Rose/Getty Images
George Rose/Getty Images

Chrysler decided it wanted to take something old and reoutfit it for a modern crowd. And so, the PT Cruiser relaunch went into effect. Unfortunately for the company, people weren’t ready for a nostalgic trip yet, making the retro-looking cruiser a very overlooked car.

While there was nothing wrong with the car underneath the hood, the PT Cruiser lacked the modern flair that was catching customers’ eyes. People were looking for sleek and a nice paint job, not boxy with a wooden exterior.

The 1967 Renault 10 Had A Breaking Issue

1967 Renault R-10
Fred Enke/The Enthusiast Network via Getty Images/Getty Images
Fred Enke/The Enthusiast Network via Getty Images/Getty Images

While the Renault 10 was wildly successful in the United States, with its rear air conditioning and engine, the 1967 model was a huge letdown. Before, people were excited to see what the company was going to produce next, never expecting a slew of issues to arise.

From not being able to handle the car to bad breaking issues, buyers wildly saw the 1967 Renault 10 as a failure from its predecessor.

Crosley Hotshot Wasn’t A Good Seller

Crosley Hotshot Wasn't A Good Seller
jaykrisch/reddit
jaykrisch/reddit

Once upon a time, Crosley was known for being an affordable car manufacturer, releasing vehicles for the common man. Well, in hopes of elevating their reputation, they came out with the Crosley Hotshot.

The car was everything the company hoped for, aside from being a best seller. Whether it was the low-riding style of the Hotshot or the cheap-looking hinge doors, people weren’t buying what Crosley was trying to sell them with the Hotshot.

King Midget Model I Was A Build-It-Yourself Car

King Midget Model I Was A Build-It-Yourself Car
Pinterest
Pinterest

It’s hard to imagine, but the King Midget Model I was a do-it-yourself car that you built at home. First coming onto the market in the 1940s, the first generation of the King Midget came as a $500 kit.

The kit included axles, a sheet metal pattern so the sides of the car could be crafted, and a frame. The good news is that any single-cylinder would be good enough to power the quirky car. Needless to say, it wasn’t a hit.

There Was No Reason To Own A Waterman Arrowbile

There Was No Reason To Own A Waterman Arrowbile
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

There’s a reason only five Waterman Arrowbile’s were ever built. And that reason is who needs a tailless aircraft that just so happens to be able to drive on a highway? Answer: no one.

While the Waterman Arrowbile does hold the distinction of being the “first-ever flying car,” it’s not really practical for everyday use. Of course, there were a few adrenaline junkies who were all for trying it out! But the sole working one can now be found in the Smithsonian.

Chrysler Sebring Did The American People No Favors

Chrysler Sebring Did The American People No Favors
Ken Hively/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Ken Hively/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Michael Scott might love his leased Chrysler Sebring in The Office, but the American people didn’t hold the same sentiment when it was released. When people discussed mid-sized cars, the Sebring would typically be named at the bottom of the list.

From the car’s second-rate style to its awful performance, the Chrysler Sebring took all of the bad parts of post-Recession Detroit and threw it into a car that no one wanted to drive.

AMC Gremlin Should Have Rethought Its Name

AMC Gremlin Should Have Rethought Its Name
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

When a car is named “Germlin,” it’s safe to say things are going to go bad before they’re good. If good is even an option, that is. Which, when it comes to the AMC Gremlin it’s not.

The unfortunate people who wound up buying this car got nothing but a classic-looking car that was nothing but cheap. Considering it was one of the cheapest cars on the market, this is one of those instances where buyers got less than what they paid for.

Jeep Compass Was Ranked As One Of The Worst SUVs

Jeep Compass Was Ranked As One Of The Worst SUVs
GEOFF ROBINS/AFP via Getty Images
GEOFF ROBINS/AFP via Getty Images

While Jeep lovers swear by the company, there is one model, a lot of people couldn’t get behind, the Compass. In a 2016 Consumer Reports survey, the Jeep Compass had the worst satisfaction rating out of any SUV on the market.

Some of the complaints included the bad milage, uncomfortable cabin, and a noisy overall experience. Considering people consider a Jeep as more of a lifestyle than a brand, it’s surprising to see that over 50 percent of buys regret their Compass purchase.

Kia Spectra’s Have horrible Safety Records

Kia Spectra's Have horrible Safety Records
David Cooper/Toronto Star via Getty Images
David Cooper/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Unfortunately for the Kia Spectra, it not only had a horrible resell price, but its safety record is so bad that it probably doesn’t matter anyway. Not only that, but the car was known to have a horrible drivetrain and less-than-stellar fuel economy, making the up-keep expensive.

Ironically, a cheaply maintained car is one of the reasons people are attracted to the Kia. The Spectra kind of dropped the ball on customer service expectations!

The Hummer H2 Was A Fuel Economy Disaster

The Hummer H2 Was A Fuel Economy Disaster
J. Vespa/WireImage
J. Vespa/WireImage

Even those who loved the original Hummer and all things the brand had to offer couldn’t get behind the horrible car that is the Hummer H2. Starting with beyond terrible fuel economy and ending in a weird elongated body kit, the H2 has pretty much nothing going for it.

Well, maybe a few things. The H2 is a bit slimmer than its predecessor. Yup, that’s this monstrosity of a car’s silver-lining.

Chevrolet Aveo

Chevrolet Introduces The Aveo RS Show Car
General Motors via Getty Images
General Motors via Getty Images

While the Chevrolet Aveo translates to “desire,” the only emotion it really evokes from people is dred, despair, and maybe a bit of hate. That’s technically three emotions, but they’re all accurate.

Between the unnecessary 14-inch wheels, the horrid transmission, and its odd shape, the Chevy Aveo had to go through a huge makeover before becoming an acceptable vehicle to drive on the road. That makeover turned the Aveo into the Sonic.

Dodge Coronet Went Out Of Style Right Away

Dodge Coronet Went Out Of Style Right Away
Dean Batchelor/The Enthusiast Network via Getty Images/Getty Images
Dean Batchelor/The Enthusiast Network via Getty Images/Getty Images

The Dodge Coronet was designed for one specific group of people, those who enjoy flash and never flying under the radar. Coming off the production line at the end of the 1950s, this car’s back fins went out of style almost immediately.

Unfortunately for Dodge, a well-respected company, the Coronet was really nothing more than a joke. A car that would never pass a police car without getting pulled over solely because of how “out there” it looked.