These NFL Players Are The Definition Of Toughness

You have to be tough as nails to play in the NFL. Every second a player is on the field, they risk taking a brutal hit. The passion the best players have is so great it makes the pain worth it. How else would a player like Brett Favre start 297 consecutive games?

The players we watch on the field every Sunday leave us in awe. Whether is from their ability to get up after a big hit, or be the one delivering the blow. These are the toughest players in NFL history. Did your favorite make the list?

Frank Gore Doesn’t Know The Meaning Of The Word Quit

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Bryan M. Bennett/Getty Images
Bryan M. Bennett/Getty Images

Before playing a down in the NFL, Frank Gore’s viability in the league was questioned. He had multiple knee injuries and was labeled a huge draft risk. The 49ers took a chance on him and were rewarded with one of the toughest running backs of all-time.

Still playing in his late 30s, Gore has amassed more than 15,000 yards over his career and is a shoo-in for the Hall of Fame if he ever retires.

Dick Butkus Was Relentless

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Collegiate Images, LLC/WireImage
Collegiate Images, LLC/WireImage

Dick Butkus was relentless for his nine-year career. He was a linebacker for the Bears and was selected to eight Pro Bowls. He was also named a first-team All-Pro six times. There’s a reason Bears’ fans remember him as fondly as they do!

Anther NFL legend, Deacon Jones, was once asked to describe Butkus. He said, “a well-conditioned animal, and every time he hit you, he tried to put you in the cemetery, not the hospital.”

Jim Browns Was A Bruising Runner

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

Jim Brown’s nine-year career in the NFL was brilliant. He was a hard-nosed runner who defenders feared. His 12,000 career rushing yards are a testament to how good he was, and his 100 touchdowns show how tough he was.

Speaking about how tough he was, Brown once remarked, “make sure when anyone tackles you, he remembers how much it hurt.” In 1971, Brown was inducted in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and was unquestionably the best runner of his generation.

Ronnie Lott Ignored The Pain

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George Gojkovich/Getty Images

Ronnie Lott is known as one of the greatest defensive backs of all-time. He was one of the league’s hardest hitters and didn’t shy away from playing through the pain. His toughness is legendary, and one story has been exaggerated because of it.

During a major game, Lott has the tip of one of his fingers crushed. The story says he then had his fingers amputated so he could keep playing. The truth is he played with the injury, then had the tip of his finger removed in the offseason.

Jack Youngblood Didn’t Let A Broken Leg Stop Him

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

During his 14-year career, Jack Youngblood only missed one game despite suffering one serious injury. In 1979, the Rams were playing in the divisional round of the playoffs when Youngblood broke his leg.

Shockingly, that injury is not the reason he missed a game. He kept playing, even having a dominant performance in the Super Bowl. The Rams lost to the Steelers, but not because of Youngblood.

Mean Joe Greene Was All Bark With A Little Bite

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Focus on Sport via Getty Images

A force of nature on defense, Joe Greene had a reputation as a player for being nasty on the field. He helped lead the Steelers’ defense for years, but all he ever wanted for was his fans to know he really wasn’t very mean.

Greene finally got his chance thanks to a Coca Cola commercial that showed him give him a game-used towel to a young fan. The famous spot showed off that Greene wasn’t the same personality off the field that he portrayed on it.

Walter Payton Was The Greatest

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Focus on Sport via Getty Images

Walter Payton was known as “sweetness” on the field, but ask any defender and they’ll tell you he really wasn’t that nice. Payton was a bruiser and when he retired, he was the NFL’s all-time leading rusher.

The peak of Payton’s career came in 1977 when he rushed for 1,852 yards and scored 14 touchdowns. In 14 seasons, he surpassed 1,000 yards 11 times, and unthinkable accomplishment today and a testament to how tough he was.

Lawrence Taylor Was Unstoppable On The Field

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

Like other defenders on this list, Lawrence Taylor is legendary for his ability to lay down multiple devastating hist a game. He played in the NFL for 13 seasons, and if it weren’t for several off-field issues, he may have even been able to play more.

Taylor retired after 13 seasons with 132 career sacks. If he had managed to stay out of trouble with the law, we have every reason to believe that he could have reached 200 if he really tried.

Phillip Rivers Refuses To Take A Break

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Rob Carr/Getty Images

Say whatever you want about Philip Rivers, you can’t deny he is one of the toughest quarterbacks to ever play in the NFL. He gets up after hit and just keeps throwing dimes. He may not have won a championship yet, but that doesn’t mean he doesn’t deserve your respect.

Rivers spent most of his career with the Chargers before signing with the Colts in the 2020 offseason. Will he be the difference-maker Indianapolis has been looking for since Peyton Manning retired?

John Elway Did What Phillip Rivers Couldn’t

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Bettmann/Getty Images

When John Elway entered the NFL he was called a diva. He famously refused to play for the team that drafted him, eventually forcing his way to the Denver Broncos. Once there, he played through the hurt and proved how tough he was, both mentally and physically.

Near the end of his career, a new book was being written about Elway, one that stated he couldn’t handle big games. Elway led the Broncos to four Super Bowls, losing twice early in his career. Then, to close out his career, Elway wrote his own ending, winning back-to-back Super Bowls.

Mike Ditka Showed What Tight Ends Were Really Capable Of

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

These days, Mike Ditka is known more for his head coaching resume than his days as a player. A tight end by trade, Ditka revolutionized the position, showing athleticism and toughness that the league had never seen.

When Ditka had the ball in his hands and was charging downfield, it was safer for defenders to get out of the way then try and tackle him. It was this reputation that ensured Ditka a spot in Canton and opened the door for other similar tight ends like Shannon Sharpe and Rob Gronkowski.

Hines Ward Rarely Missed A Game

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Diamond Images/Getty Images

In the NFL, it’s rare for a wide receiver to play for 14 seasons with the level of production Hines Ward did. A Steelers’ legend, Ward rarely missed a game, had hands that rarely dropped balls, and loved blocking for his running backs.

It is that last statement that earns Ward his sport here. Receivers don’t usually get involved in the blocking game, but for Ward, it was a point of pride. It helped that Jerome Bettis was carrying the rock most of the time.

Jack Lambert Was As Tough As They Come

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

Four-time Super Bowl champion Jack Lambert is considered by many to be one of the toughest players to ever put on shoulder pads, Playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers, the man missing his front four teeth set the tone for one of the most iconic defensive fronts in league history.

In 1976, after a 1-4 start to the season, Lambert blasted his teammates, saying they needed to win out to defend their title. And you know what happened? They won nine straight games, allowing a total of two touchdowns in that span.

Jim Otto Didn’t Let Surgery Hold Him Back

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Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images

Over the course of his 15-year career, Jim Otto underwent a mind-boggling 74 operations! By the time he retired, Otto regretted nothing. Reflecting on his career he wrote The Pain of Glory.

In the book, he revealed that his surgeries didn’t always go as planned and he nearly died several times. Still, Otto did what he had to do to keep his career afloat, and for that, he has our undying respect and admiration.

Bruce Matthews Didn’t Miss A Game For 14 Seasons

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George Gojkovich/Getty Images

As if playing in the NFL for 19 seasons isn’t enough, Bruce Matthews was so tough that he never missed a game in his 14 years. His 296 career games played is third behind Brett Favre and Jerry Rice for non-kickers.

During his career, Matthews was elected to 14 Pro Bowls. And if you still doubt his toughness, consider this – the average career of an offensive lineman is three seasons. Matthews played for 19.

Emmitt Smith Is The All-Time Rushing Leader

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Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

You didn’t think this list would be complete without the NFL’s all-time leading rusher, did you? Emmitt Smith played for 15 seasons and retired with over 18,000 yards rushing. That record is one of the few in the league that feels like it will never be touched.

Smith played a vital role in the Dallas Cowboys championship dynasty of the ’90s. He didn’t always have the best offensive line, so he always ran with authority. Smith spent the last two years of his career in Arizona before calling it quits for good.

Doug Flutie Never Quit

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Rick Stewart/Allsport/Getty Images

Doug Flute was never supposed to be a successful quarterback in the NFL. Standing just five feet and ten inches tall, he is still the shortest starting QB in league history. And while players like Drew Brees, Russell Wilson, and Baker Mayfield have changed the way scouts look at height recently, Flutie really started the trend.

Always having to prove himself, Flutie played as long as he could. He was 43-years-old when he retired, last lacing up for the New England Patriots in 2005.

Steve Young Put His Body Through A Gauntlet

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Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

Steve Young was one of the NFL’s original running quarterbacks. Playing at a time defenses could really level signal-callers, he put his body through a gauntlet that would cause most modern quarterbacks to retire today.

To prove the pain was worth it, Young set a Super Bowl record by throwing for six touchdown passes and getting the “monkey off his back” handed down to him from Joe Montana. When he retired, Young had helped introduce the NFL to the mobile quarterback, setting the stage for players like Michael Vick and Lamar Jackson.

Jerome Bettis Ran People Over

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Sean Brady/NFLPhotoLibrary
Sean Brady/NFLPhotoLibrary

There’s a reason Jerome Bettis was nicknamed “The Bus.” Built like a fullback, but playing running back, Bettis never shied away from contact, oftentimes preferring to run right through defenders. And somehow, despite all the physical contact, Bettis played for 13 seasons.

In those 13 seasons, Bettis won a Super Bowl, was elected to six Pro Bowls, and rarely missed a game. In 2015, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Brett Favre Played Through The Pain

Quarterback Brett Favre #4 of the Green Bay Packers looks on from the field during a game
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George Gojkovich/Getty Images

Brett Favre is the “Iron Man” of the NFL. Once he became entrenched as a starting quarterback he went on an unprecedented streak. Favre started 297 consecutive games under center, jumping back up after every hit.

That toughness might even be why Favre came out of retirement on two separate occasions. Favre ended up playing until injuries finally started catching up to him, although rumors persist today he is considering coming out of retirement for the third time.

Jim Marshall Was The Defensive Iron Man

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

A defensive end by trade, Jim Marshall set the NFL record for defensive players by appearing in 282 consecutive games. In that span, Marshall had an ulcer and overcame off-field violence to never miss a snap.

Sometimes it’s not what you do on the field that proves your toughness. In Marshall’s case, of course, it’s both. To play in 282 consecutive games is hard enough, and to do with with a few dangerous off-field issues is nearly impossible.

Rocky Bleier Came Back From A Career-Ending Injury

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

You might not know the name Rocky Bleier, but after hearing his story you’ll never forget it. As a rookie in Pittsburgh, he was sensational, but before he could make a real impact he was drafted into the army.

While serving, Bleier was shot in his leg and awarded a Purple Heart. He was told by doctors he would never play football again. Then he got a letter from the Steelers saying they needed him. Against all odds, Bleier began rehab and training and ultimately made his way back to the starting lineup.

Deacon Jones Coined The Term Sack

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Bettmann/Getty Images

When Deacon Jones played in the NFL, the “sack” was not a statistic that was recorded. He was so ruthless when it came to tackling QBs, though, that it was invented just for him.

Because of this, we will never know how many sacks Jones finished his career with. The numbers vary, with some experts saying 172, while other claims it should be well over 200. Either way, you know you’re tough when a statistic is created because of how you play the game.

Y.A. Tittle Probably Should Have Been Benched

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Focus on Sport via Getty Images

Y.A. Tittle was just about as tough as you can make a quarterback. He played in the NFL for 15 seasons and even played one season where injuries should have forced the team to bench him.

The injury came after Tittle threw a pick-six. He was hit, left with a bloody face, suffered a massive concussion, and cracked a rib. He then went on to play the rest of the season.

Larry Csonka Had A High Opinion Of Himself

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

The first fullback on this list, Larry Csonka was a tone-setter on offense who had a very high opinion of himself. Preferring to run through defenders instead of around them, he once said if he went on safari that lions would “roll their windows up” when they saw him.

The 1972 season defined Csonka’s career. Playing with the Dolphins, he rushed for over 1,000 yards, a rare feat for a fullback. Miami went undefeated that year, becoming the only perfect team in NFL history.

Lynn Swann Played Through The Pain

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George Gojkovich/Getty Images

While it’s impossible to deny that Lynn Swann’s shorter than normal career should disqualify him from this list, it’s important to remember one thing – opposing defenses were constantly crushing the WR so he wouldn’t be able to burn them.

Most famously, during an AFC title game, Swann had to be hospitalized from a hit that gave him a severe concussion. He stayed in the hospital for two days. He then played in the Super Bowl, where he racked up 161 receiving yards and a touchdown.

Randy White Was The “Manster” Of Dallas

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

Randy White wasn’t always the biggest defensive tackle on the football field, but he was one of the toughest. During his days as a Dallas Cowboy, he was known as the “Manster” for being “half man and half monster.”

In 1978, he became one of the only defensive players to win Super Bowl MVP honors. In 14 seasons, he played in 209 games, only missing one. After retiring, White founded the Thai Boxing Association of America.

Jackie Slater Played For 20 Seasons

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George Rose/Getty Images

When Jackie Slater was drafted by the Rams in 1976, Gerald Ford was the President. When he retired 20 seasons later, Bill Clinton was. He played his entire career with the Rams, both in Los Angeles and St. Louis.

By the time he retired, Slater has set the NFL record for most seasons played with one franchise. He was enshrined in the Hall of Fame in 2001 during his first year of eligibility.

Bruce Smith Was Unstoppable

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

Legendary defensive lineman Bruce Smith played 19 grueling seasons in the NFL. In 13 of those seasons, he recorded double-digit sacks, even though he was the most double-teamed player in the league at the time.

Smith played most of his career with the Buffalo Bills and retired with 200 sacks. No other player has been able to reach the two-century mark, although Reggie White came close with 198.

Mike Webster Was Addicted To Playing

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George Gojkovich/Getty Images

After spending 15 seasons in Pittsburgh, Mike Webster took his talent to Kansas City. At the time, he was brought in to be on the team’s coaching staff. After some conversations, he convinced the team to let him play.

Webster won four Super Bowls during his career, and is noted as being one of the first players to bring attention to CTE. In 2002, Webster had a heart attack and passed away, and today is remembered as one of the greatest Steelers in team history.

Roger Craig Was A Double Threat

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

Roger Craig was one of the NFL’s first “offensive weapons,” and his body took a beating as a result of it. A running back who could always play wide receiver, Craig touched the ball a lot during the 49ers’ Bill Walsh era.

Craig was the first player in league history to rush for 1,000 yards and rack up 1,000 receiving yards in the same season. Quite frankly, it’s surprising that Craig has not yet been inducted into the Hall of Fame.

George Atkinson Was A Brutal Hitter

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George Gojkovich/Getty Images

Considered undersized for his position, safety George Atkinson made up for it with just how hard he could hit. He was a missile on the field, which was both a good thing and a bad thing.

After giving Lynn Swann his second concussion, Atkinson was labeled as a dirty player who contained “the criminal element.” Atkinson played in the league for 12 seasons, and won a Super Bowl with the Raiders in 1976.

Brian Dawkins Loved To Lay Down The Hammer

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Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Brian Dawkins may have played safety in the NFL, but with how hard he hit, he could have played linebacker, too. He was nicknamed “Weapon X” while he was on the Eagles for his physical style of play.

Drafted in 1996, Dawkins spent the first 13 years of his career with the Eagles, appearing in one Super Bowl and being named a First-Team All-Pro four times. And like so many others on this list, after he retired, Dawkins was enshrined in Canton, Ohio.

Mark Bavaro Put The Giants On His Back

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

In 1986, in a game against the San Francisco 49ers, New York Giants’ tight end Mark Bavaro proved how tough he was when it took multiple defenders to take him down.

Bavaro was a key member in the Giants’ Super Bowl run in the ’80s, and it’s hard to imagine the team getting there, much less winning, without their toughest offensive player. After retiring, Bavaro became a writer, having his first novel published in 2008.

Walt Garrison Competed In Rodeo On The Side

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Focus On Sport/Getty Images

When he wasn’t running over defenders for the Dallas Cowboys in the ’70s, Walt Garrison was competing in rodeo competitions. While such a practice would be frowned upon today, it showed just how tough Garrison was back then.

On the field, Garrison played through extreme pain. In the 1970 NFC championship game against the 49ers, it was reported that he played with a serious ankle injury and cracked collarbone. Ouch!

Reggie White Fought Through Double Teams

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George Gojkovich/Getty Images

Like Bruce Smith before him, Reggie White’s life on the football field was filled with double teams. He was one of the most feared defenders of his time, and retied with 198 sacks and a clear path to a first-ballot Hall of Fame induction.

And if White had started his career in the NFL instead of the USFL, he might be the league’s all-time sack leader. Tragically, White passed away in 2004 after a cardiac arrhythmia.

Kellen Winslow Sr. Had No Stop Button

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

Known as one of the greatest tight ends to ever play in the NFL, Kellen Winslow Sr. was an unstoppable force. His 1982 playoff performance as a Charger against the Dolphins is legendary.

During that incredible match up, Winslow Sr. led San Diego to victory with a touchdown, over 100 receiving yards, and a blocked field goal. Oh yeah, did we mention he played the game with four injuries? If that doesn’t define tough, we don’t know what does.

George Blanda Played Multiple Positions

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images

Best known as a quarterback, George Blanda played his professional football career from 1949 until 1975. During his time on the gridiron, Blanda played several positions including linebacker and placekicker.

Late in his career, by the time Blanda was no longer a viable starting quarterback, he became a full-time placekicker, which is one of the reasons his career was extended for so long. In 1981, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Earl Campbell’s Career Was Short But Powerful

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A. Kaye/Getty Images

Another player with a shorter career is Earl Campbell. A bruising running back, he looked for contact, always hoping to impose his will on the other team. After seven seasons putting a beating on defenders, Campbell abruptly retired.

At the time of his retirement, Campbell said, “I’m a man; I’m not a little boy. I believe this is the best thing—not only for myself but for the Saints.”

Joe Staley Was A Warrior

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Joe Robbins/Getty Images

Joe Staley played his entire 13-year career with the San Francisco 49ers. In that time, he saw the ultimate ups and downs of the game, going to two Super Bowls while also fighting his way through multiple miserable losing seasons.

Throughout it all, Staley was always on the field, setting an example for his teammates about being tough. Now that he’s retired, it is expected he will wind up in the Hall of Fame.